Conference Overview & Program

23
Dec

Conference Overview & Program

Welcome to Pecora 20.

With emphasis on recent significant developments in remote sensing, the theme of Pecora 20 is “Observing a Changing Earth: Science for Decisions…Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection.” This conference will offer a program on applications of satellite and other Earth observations to monitor, assess, and perform projections of future land and water resources, as well as big data and other analytical technologies to improve decision making utilizing satellite data.

The Pecora Symposium series was established by the USGS and NASA in the 1970s as a forum to: 1) foster the exchange of scientific information and results derived from applications of Earth observing data to a broad range of land-based resources; and 2) discuss ideas, policies, and strategies concerning land remote sensing.

Pecora 20 Preliminary Program

Keynote Speaker –            

Barbara J. RyanSecretariat Director of the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO)

Ms. Ryan is the Secretariat Director of the Intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in Geneva, Switzerland. GEO is comprised of 104 Member States, the European Commission, and 109 international scientific and technical partner organizations.   Since becoming Director of GEO in 2012, Ryan has worked to integrate Earth observation systems from around the world into a single, comprehensive system that uses coordinated data to understand how environmental factors impact human life.  Prior to her work at GEO, she was the Associate Director for Geography at the USGS, where she was responsible for the agency’s remote sensing, geography and civilian mapping programmes, including the Landsat satellites. It was during this time she led the effort to change the decade-old Landsat data policy to full and open, an action resulting in more than 42 million scenes being downloaded globally to date. Ryan has served as chair of the international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, which coordinates information from more than 100 civilian satellite missions, and in 2008, became director of the World Meteorological Organization’s space programme. Ryan has been awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree from SUNY Cortland. She was recently named an Honorary Fellow of the American Geographical Society, and in January 2017, was one of 10 global leaders to be named to the Geospatial World Forum’s Hall of Fame.

Michael H. Freilich – Director, Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters

Ms. Ryan is the Secretariat Director of the Intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in Geneva, Switzerland. GEO is comprised of 104 Member States, the European Commission, and 109 international scientific and technical partner organizations.   Since becoming Director of GEO in 2012, Ryan has worked to integrate Earth observation systems from around the world into a single, comprehensive system that uses coordinated data to understand how environmental factors impact human life.  Prior to her work at GEO, she was the Associate Director for Geography at the USGS, where she was responsible for the agency’s remote sensing, geography and civilian mapping programmes, including the Landsat satellites. It was during this time she led the effort to change the decade-old Landsat data policy to full and open, an action resulting in more than 42 million scenes being downloaded globally to date. Ryan has served as chair of the international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, which coordinates information from more than 100 civilian satellite missions, and in 2008, became director of the World Meteorological Organization’s space programme. Ryan has been awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree from SUNY Cortland. She was recently named an Honorary Fellow of the American Geographical Society, and in January 2017, was one of 10 global leaders to be named to the Geospatial World Forum’s Hall of Fame.

Harry A. Cikanek – Director (acting), STAR – Center for Satellite Applications and Research

Harry is the acting Director for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), the unit of the NOAA Satellite and Information Service responsible for transforming raw and intermediate satellite data flows from NOAA and global observing system satellites into real time weather and environmental data and information products. These feed forecast models, and operations personnel in the National Weather Service, National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and support research, and long term environmental information products to meet NOAA’s and its partner weather and environmental information needs to protect life, property and livelihoods.

Prior to this assignment, Harry served just over five years as the first Director of the NOAA Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). His
major JPSS accomplishments included stabilizing and streamlining the program to tighten its focus on the weather mission while avoiding over $2 billion in cost. He oversaw the successful transition of the Suomi National Polar Partnership (the first JPSS mission) satellite to NOAA operations and its continued successful operations in support of the NOAA weather mission. Harry began his career as a NASA aerospace engineer. His 30 years at NASA included engineering and program management in rocket propulsion, launch services, space transportation technology, and human exploration of space. He served at both the NASA Glenn Research Center and Marshall Space Flight Center contributing to a diverse array of programs including Space Shuttle Main Engine, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle, Advanced Space Transportation Program, Orion, and several robotic science and technology missions and flight experiments. He is the author or coauthor of over 25 papers and articles. He is also a recipient of the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, and is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Samuel N. Goward – Research Professor/Emeritus Professor, University of Maryland

Dr. Goward pursues biophysical applications of land remotely sensed data. He has been actively involved in the land observation missions since the 1970s, specifically focused on Landsat and AVHRR. His recent research has focused on evaluating North American forest disturbance and regrowth from the historical Landsat observation record for the North American Carbon Program (NACP). He currently is serving as a member of the NACP science steering group. He served as the Landsat Science Team Leader for Landsat 7 and continues as a member of the Landsat Science Team today. In addition he served as the Co-Chair for the USGS National Land Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive (NLSLRSDA) advisory committee. In recognition of his long-standing commitment to land
observations and the Landsat mission, Dr. Goward has received the USGS John Wesley Powell award, the USGS/NASA William T. Pecora award and the ASPRS SAIC Estes Teaching award. He continues to serve as an associate editor for Remote Sensing of Environment.

Curtis E. Woodcock – Professor of Earth and Environment, Boston University

Dr. Woodcock has held academic positions at the University of California, the City University of New York and Boston University. His
primary research interests are: the use of remote sensing to monitor land change, including topics of time series analysis, cloud/cloud
shadow detection, and validation of time series results; terrestrial carbon dynamics; the causes and consequences of land cover and land use change. Dr. Woodcock was the 2016 William T. Pecora Award winner for “outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing.” He currently is co-team leader for the Landsat Science Team.

Mike Warren – Co-founder and CTO, Descartes Labs

Mike Warren – Co-founder and CTO, Descartes Labs

Mike Warren is the Co-founder and CTO of Descartes Labs. His past work spans a wide range of disciplines, with the recurring theme of developing and applying advanced software and computing technology to understand the physical and virtual world. He was a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 25 years, and also worked as a Senior Software Engineer at Sandpiper Networks/Digital Island. His work has been recognized on multiple occasions, including the Gordon Bell prize for outstanding achievement in high-performance computing. He has degrees in Physics and Engineering & Applied Science from Caltech, and he received a PhD
in Physics from University of California, Santa Barbara.

Dr. Valerie Pasquarella

Dr. Valerie Pasquarella works at the intersection of remote sensing and ecology, using time series of satellite imagery to improve mapping and monitoring of landscape dynamics. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the DOI Northeast Climate Science Center and the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Having lived and worked in Southern New England for over a decade, Dr. Pasquarella actively collaborates with a number of local research groups and land management agencies, and her research has strong regional ties. Ongoing projects include using Landsat time series to improve forest composition mapping and near-real-time monitoring of gypsy moth defoliation. She is also interested in time series approaches to mapping early successional habitat and invasive plant distributions, with a long-term goal of utilizing all available Landsat observations to advance understanding of multi-scale multi-species interactions over large spatial extents.

Plenary sessions

 

  • Current state of Earth observations
  • Pecora award presentation and panel of recent Pecora award winners discussing progress and challenges in remote sensing
  • Trends in big data analytics and progress in using Earth observations
  • New breakthroughs in Earth observations and applications

Town Hall Sessions

 Landsat 10 User Needs (POC: Zhuoting Wu)

In this town hall, the USGS will provide an overview of the Landsat 10 user requirements collection process and summary results followed by a question-and-answer session. The USGS and NASA are working together to develop Landsat 10, scheduled to launch in the 2027 timeframe as part of the Sustainable Land Imaging program. The USGS Land Remote Sensing Program has collected user requirements from a range of applications to help formulate the Landsat 9 follow-on mission (Landsat 10) through the Requirements, Capabilities and Analysis (RCA) activity. User requirements collected through RCA will help inform future Landsat 10 sensor designs and mission characteristics. Current Federal civil community users have provided hundreds of requirements through systematic, in-depth interviews. Academic, State, local, industry, and international Landsat user community input was also incorporated in the process. Emphasis was placed on spatial resolution, temporal revisit, and spectral characteristics, as well as other aspects such as accuracy, continuity, sampling condition, data access and format. This is an opportunity for government, academia, industry users, and data and value-added products providers to learn about the RCA activity and have an open-forum exchange on future Landsat 10 user needs and capabilities.

EROS Data User Group (POC: Rynn Lamb and Raad Saleh)

In early 2018, USGS/EROS expects to launch a new initiative to support direct engagement with the Landsat and related remote sensing community through formation of an EROS Data User Group (EDUG). The primary purpose of this user group will be to: (1) provide operational users of Landsat and related products an opportunity and platform to discuss opinions, needs, and concerns in a structured manner; (2) obtain user feedback and input for potential incorporation into EROS operations to support the continuous improvement of USGS products and services; and (3) provide for targeted communications and direct feedback from selected members of the user community regarding internal development efforts.

This town hall session will provide a high-level description of the proposed user group and allow for input and feedback from the Pecora science and applications community.  Key elements planned for discussion include: user group description and mission, justification, roles and responsibilities, membership, communication mechanisms, and proposed operational flow.

Workshops

 The EROS CalVal Center of Excellence (ECCOE) First CalVal

Cross-calibration of Landsat 8 OLI and Sentinel 2 MSI and its impact on data interoperability Click here for more info (PDF, 2.7 MB)

Special Sessions (Schedule TBA)

Training the next generation of remote sensing scientists through undergraduate research opportunities
Moderators:  Rebecca L. Dodge and Robert L. Bolin, Graduate School of Petroleum Geology

From cloud computing to no-cost Landsat data and low-cost data collected from Unmanned Aircraft Systems, remote sensing technology is changing faster than ever before at a time when the need for a highly trained and adaptive geospatial workforce is perhaps greater than ever. In this session, StateView panelists from AmericaView, a nationwide consortium dedicated to remote sensing research, outreach, and education, will share their successes in building the remote sensing workforce of tomorrow through a network of undergraduate research opportunities. StateViews may focus research on state-specific issues important to local and regional stakeholders, such as urban expansion, coastal studies, forestry, agriculture, or grazing; international research applications are also available.   Panelists will share lessons learned as well as valuable insights about recruiting, training, and mentoring undergraduate students on data processing, information extraction, and presentation skills.  This will be followed by a Q&A and discussion session.

Panelists:

  • Rebecca Dodge, Robert L. Bolin Graduate School of Petroleum Geology
  • Larry Biehl, Purdue University
  • Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne, University of Vermont
  • Ramesh Sivanpillai, University of Wyoming
  • Yong Wang, East Carolina University

Petascale High Performance Computing
Moderator:  Steve Swazee, GITA Executive Director/SharedGeo

With the growth of daily commercial, higher resolution, optical and radar satellite systems to the explosion of centimeter level cameras on Unmanned Aerial Systems, the question is not can one get imagery but how can one handle it all?  Petascale High Performance Computing is a major emerging technology system that has bypassed traditional remote sensing computer workstation approaches. This panel is designed to facilitate a broad discussion of where the industry is today and where it is going in the future.  The panelists represent a cross section of academic, business, and government sectors.

Panelists:

  • Chris Doescher, U.S. Geological Survey
    Lanny Faleide, Satshot.com
    Mark Korver, Amazon Web Services
    Paul Morin, University of Minnesota, Polar Geospatial Center
    Joel Schlagel, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long land cover history, starting with the 1976 landmark A Land Use and Land Cover Classification System for use with Remote Sensor Data and including global land cover mapping and the ongoing production of the National Land Cover Database.  While these past projects have had a significant impact, land cover data needs are changing due to the demand for increasingly innovative and timely land cover products needed to meet the community’s insatiable appetite for science-quality geospatial land cover and land change data.  Recent research on the use of the unprecedented depth of the Landsat archive has resulted in the potential to generate higher quality results that include additional land cover variables, more detailed legends, and more frequent land cover and land change geospatial and statistical information. To capitalize on new
capabilities, the USGS is working closely with researchers from Boston University and Texas Tech University to implement the Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) initiative.  LCMAP is envisioned as an end-to-end capability that uses the rich Landsat record to continuously track and characterize changes in land cover, use, and condition and translate such information into assessments of current and historical processes of cover and change. LCMAP aims to generate science-quality land cover and land change products from current and near-real time Landsat data. All available Landsat data for any given location are used to characterize land cover and change at any point
across the full Landsat record and to detect and characterize land cover and land change as it occurs.  Three special sessions will lay out the foundations of LCMAP, review the initial progress toward developing a new generation of land cover and land change products, and examine how these new products are addressing land change applications.


LCMAP1: Foundations
Moderator:  Curtis Woodcock, Boston University

Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP): expanding the understanding and management of land change
Tom Loveland, U.S. Geological Survey

Large area annual land cover maps derived from analysis ready Landsat time series data
Zhe Zhu, Texas Tech University

Analysis Ready Data:  Reconditioning the Landsat archive to support time series investigations
John Dwyer, U.S. Geological Survey

Collection of National land cover and land change reference data for a 30+ year time series accuracy assessment
Bruce Pengra, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies

Accuracy assessment and area estimation for annual land-cover monitoring
Steve Stehman, SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry

LCMAP2: Initial Results
Moderators: Jim Vogelmann, U.S. Geological Survey

A new generation of U.S. land-cover products
Christopher Barber, ASRC Federal Inuteq

A new generation of U.S. land change products
Jim Vogelmann, U.S. Geological Survey

A new generation of land change products: implications for studying carbon stocks and fluxes in the Pacific Northwest
Ben Sleeter, U.S. Geological Survey

Deconstructing developed and forested areas in the Chesapeake Bay watershed
Peter Claggett, U.S. Geological Survey

Comparing Land Cover Trends Project’s normalized annual change and LCMAP’s annual change in the Puget Lowland Ecoregion
Roger Auch, U.S. Geological Survey

Forest harvest patterns in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, 1985-2014
Chris Soulard, U.S. Geological Survey

LCMAP3: Time Series Research and Development
Moderator: Curtis Woodcock, Boston University

Exploring the Landsat archive using time series analysis
Curtis Woodcock, Boston University

Using a 30-year Landsat time series of Arctic and Boreal North America to investigate climate change impacts on disturbance, phenology, and productivity
Damien Sulla-Menashe, Boston University

Impact of climate variability on Landsat time series and implications for change monitoring
Chris Holden, Boston University

Monitoring tropical forest degradation using time series analysis of Landsat data
Eric Bullock, Boston University

Using time series and statistical inference methods to estimate unbiased land cover change areas in the Colombian Amazon
Paulo Arevalo, Boston University


Landsat-derived Global Cropland Products @ 30-m (LGCP30)
Moderators: Prasad S. Thenkabail, U.S. Geological Survey and Russell G. Congalton, University of New Hampshire

This special session will present and discuss the world’s first Landsat-derived 30-m global cropland products @ 30-m (LGCP30). The focus will be on Landsat-derived global cropland extent @ 30-m (LGCE30) (https://croplands.org/app/map). This product maps the entire world’s 1.8 billion hectares of croplands at 30-m resolution. The presentations in the session will discuss methods and approaches used in LGCE30. Cropland mapping algorithms (CMAs) including several machine learning algorithms (MLAs) were used on 2-3 years of 16-day Landsat data cubes to derive LGCE30 using Google Earth Engine (GEE) cloud computing. Cropland areas computed for every country in the world as well as cropland areas of sub-national administrative boundaries will be discussed and compared with conventional statistics. Exhaustive discussions on accuracies, errors, and uncertainties will take place- providing error matrices with overall-producer’s, user’s, and weighted overall accuracies of some 80+ zones of the world.

Global 30-m cropland extent map for the nominal year 2015: derived using Landsat-8 time-series data and machine learning algorithms computed on google earth engine cloud
Prasad S. Thenkabail, U.S. Geological Survey

Evaluating the Performance of Various Sampling Strategies Used to Assess the Accuracy of Large Area Crop Maps
Russell G. Congalton, University of New Hampshire

An Automated Crop Intensity Algorithm (ACIA) for global cropland intensity mapping at nominal 30-m using Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 time-series data
and Google Earth Engine

Jun Xiong, Bay Area Environmental Research Institute (BAERI)

Mapping cropland extent and areas of Australia at 30-m resolution using multi-year time-series Landsat data and Random Forest machine learning algorithm through Google Earth Engine (GEE) Cloud Computing
Pardhasaradhi Teluguntla, Bay Area Environmental Research Institute (BAERI)

Mapping Croplands of Southeast Asia, Japan, and North and South Korea using Landsat 30-m time-series, random forest algorithm
Adam Oliphant, U.S. Geological Survey

Evolution of global land cover mapping: history and new developments Moderators:  Zhiliang Zhu and Brad Reed, U.S. Geological Survey

Land cover maps of the world from paper media to digital formats have been produced over the millennium. These products featured prominently in the
development of the world we know today, and the research and development of global land cover maps are still a critical scientific
endeavor in our continued effort to understand the world better. In the recent history, a variety of well-known global land cover maps or
databases have been developed using advanced remote sensing methods, which having given the scientific community important lessons learned
from the development of the products and findings from applications of the land cover information. This session is designed as a unique forum
for scientists who have played a role in developing and advancing the field of global land cover mapping to review the history of the
development, highlight recent achievements, discuss key issues and knowledge gaps still facing us today, and providing outlooks for future
science needs. The audience will learn about global land cover mapping history, recent developments, theoretical treatments, methodology
reviews, applications, and global collaborations.

A brief and personal history of global land-cover data: Have we evolved from too little to too much?
Elaine Matthews, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Reflections on the IGBP DISCover Global Land Cover Project
Dr. Thomas Loveland, U.S. Geological Survey

Automated global land cover mapping – from-GLC-2 and a new mapping portal in support of flexible mapping with Landsat data
Peng Gong, Tsinghua University, China

A strategy for global land cover monitoring using Landsat and Sentinel 2
Matthew C. Hansen, University of Maryland

Landsat gone global, going global, still going…
Alan Belward, Joint Research Centre, European Commission

Great Lakes Remote Sensing

Moderators:  
Zhiliang Zhu and Brad Reed, U.S. Geological Survey

The
Great Lakes represents about 20% of the world’s available surface freshwater.  When the Polar ice caps and Greenland melt into the ocean,
the percentage approaches 50% (assuming the volume does not change) making the Great Lakes a substantial global resource to manage for
future generations.  This session will highlight a few unique remote sensing approaches for the Great Lakes Basin which will more accurately
characterize changes over time at a sub-meter scale using a variety of sensors.  The long-term challenge is how to integrate approaches across
borders to provide systematic daily multi-sensor views of the Great Lakes Basin.

An Overview of the Binational Great Lakes Wetlands Remote Sensing Project
Brian Huberty, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

High resolution Optical and Radar Mapping and Monitoring of Coastal Great Lakes Wetlands to Inform Wetland Management Decisions
Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, Michigan Technological University

Creating high temporal frequency digital surface models in the Great Lakes Basin
James Klassen, SharedGeo

Dynamic Watercourse Hydrography Updating in Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Watersheds
Jennifer Corcoran, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Resource Assessment

Landsat Archive, Product Plans, and Data Continuity

Moderators: Brian Sauer and Jim Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey

Landsat
represents the world’s longest continuously acquired collection of space-based moderate-resolution land remote sensing data. The Landsat
program has taken several actions to expand the USGS archive holdings, further the science use, and ensure Landsat data continuity. Through the
Landsat Global Archive Consolidation Project and increased satellite acquisitions, archive holdings have reached over 7 million scenes. This
special session includes five topics that provide an archive status, science data product status and plans, and future mission plans for
continuing Landsat’s irreplaceable record.

Ensuring Proper Storage for Earth Science Data Used for Decisions: The USGS Process to Certify Trusted Digital Repositories
John Faundeen, U.S. Geological Survey

Landsat Archive Status and the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation
Kristi Kline, U.S. Geological Survey

Landsat Collections and Future Landsat Standard Product Plans
Brian Sauer, U.S. Geological Survey

Continuity and Improvements with Landsat 9
Jim Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey

An outlook for sustainable land imaging at the USGS Land Remote Sensing Program
Peter Doucette, U.S. Geological Survey

Creating a Healthy Remote Sensing Education Pipeline: Moving from K-12 to University

Moderator:  Lindi Quackenbush, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

The
remote sensing field is growing and changing rapidly.  Deployment of novel sensors requires greater prerequisite knowledge and development of
new processing methods. In order to ensure we have a well-trained workforce able to advance this field, we need to create a pipeline of
students who can engage in advanced study in remote sensing.  There are a wide range of activities that can be used to facilitate development of
interest and skills at an early level to support advanced undergraduate or graduate study and stimulate interest in remote sensing as both art
and science. This session will bring together panelists from members of the AmericaView consortium to present their experiences in a range of
pipeline topics including K-12 outreach, service learning, STEM literacy, and curriculum development.

Panelists:

  • Lindi Quackenbush, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry
  • Ken Boykin, New Mexico State University
  • James Campbell, Virginia Tech
  • Amber Imai-Hong, Hawaii Space Grant Consortium, University of Hawaii at Manoa
  • JB Sharma, University of North Georgia
  • Chandi Witharana, University of Connecticut
  • Brent Yantis, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Calibration of Satellite Imagery

Moderator:  Dennis Helder, U.S. Geological Survey

Calibration of satellite imagery is the necessary first step before data users can extract useful, quantifiable information from the imagery.  Thus, it is
paramount that the calibration step achieve an accuracy and precision that significantly exceeds that required by the applications derived
from satellite imagery.  Calibration is normally divided into geometric calibration and radiometric calibration – essentially putting the pixels
in the right place and giving them the right value.  In this session both types of calibration will be addressed from a variety of
perspectives.  Status and improvements for calibration of various sensor types will be discussed, and insights will be given on new calibration
approaches that promise improved accuracy for optical sensors in both the reflective and thermal regions.

Augmented Two Line Elements for Landsat Ephemeris Data
Mark Lubke, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies

Geometric Verification Algorithm (GVERIFY) to Validate the Accuracy of Landsat Multispectral Scanner and Thematic Mapper Data
Mark Lubke, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies

Lifetime Temporal Validation and Absolute Calibration of the EO-1 Hyperion Sensor
Xin Jing, South Dakota State University

Compact Thermal Imager Calibrator (CTIC) for Landsat-like Missions
Mary Pagnutti, Innovative Imaging & Research

Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor Radiometric Calibration Status
Julia Barsi, SSAI

Ground-based Artificial Light Source Radiometric Calibration of the VIIRS Day-Night Band High Gain Stage Early Results
Robert E. Ryan, Innovative Imaging & Research

 

National-scale Data Coordinated within the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC)

Moderator:  Collin Homer

The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium demonstrates the national benefits of USA Federal collaboration. Starting in the mid-1990s, MRLC has grown into a group of 10 USA Federal Agencies that coordinate the production of five National products, including the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP), the Cropland Data Layer (CDL), the Gap Analysis Program (GAP), and the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE). This session will overview the current status and future plans of these MRL C products.

The National Land Cover Database, Delivering Land Cover Change Data for the Nation since 2001: History, Status and Future Plans
Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey

NOAA’s Focus on the Coasts: Bringing High Resolution Land Cover Mapping to the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium
Nate Herold, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

10 Years of Annual National Land Cover Products – the Cropland Data Layer
Rick Mueller, U.S. Department of Agriculture

NLCD Tree Canopy Cover Data Product
Greg Liknes, U.S. Forest Service

LANDFIRE Remap – Developing a New Baseline Product Suite
Birgit Petersen, U.S. Geological Survey

 

National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD):  Past, Present, and Future

Moderator: Collin Homer

This session will overview the design, products and status for NLCD 2016 and future programmatic plans for NLCD. NLCD 2016 products include land
cover and urban imperviousness re-mapped for 2001-2016, tree canopy produced for 2011- 2016, and new 2016 products of percent shrub, bare
ground and herbaceousness. NLCD 2016 is expected to be more accurate and comprehensive than any previous NLCD release, and will offer users an
unprecedented set of land cover and land cover change products designed to continue, expand and advance NLCD applications.

NLCD Past and Present Product Comparison
Jon Dewitz, U.S. Geological Survey

NLCD 2016 Landcover Design
Suming Jin, ASRC Federal InuTeq, Contractor to the U.S. Geological Survey

NLCD 2016 Imperviousness Product
Jon Dewitz, U.S. Geological Survey

NLCD 2016 Shrub and Grass Products
Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey

NLCD Future Plans
George Xian, U.S. Geological Survey