Plenary Sessions

14
Sep

Schedule

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Tuesday

Welcome/Opening Remarks

Frank P. Kelly, Director, USGS EROS Center
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Plenary Sessions

Opening Keynote – Terrestrial Observations—Finally Coming of Age

Barbara J. Ryan, Secretariat Director of the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO)
Ms. Ryan is the Secretariat Director of the Intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO) in Geneva, Switzerland. GEO is comprised of 104 Member States, the European Commission, and 109 international scientific and technical partner organizations.   Since becoming Director of GEO in 2012, Ryan has worked to integrate Earth observation systems from around the world into a single, comprehensive system that uses coordinated data to understand how environmental factors impact human life.  Prior to her work at GEO, she was the Associate Director for Geography at the USGS, where she was responsible for the agency’s remote sensing, geography and civilian mapping programmes, including the Landsat satellites. It was during this time she led the effort to change the decade-old Landsat data policy to full and open, an action resulting in more than 42 million scenes being downloaded globally to date. Ryan has served as chair of the international Committee on Earth Observation Satellites, which coordinates information from more than 100 civilian satellite missions, and in 2008, became director of the World Meteorological Organization’s space programme. Ryan has been awarded an honorary doctorate of science degree from SUNY Cortland. She was recently named an Honorary Fellow of the American Geographical Society, and in January 2017, was one of 10 global leaders to be named to the Geospatial World Forum’s Hall of Fame.

TS #1—Special Session

Landsat-derived Global Cropland Products at 30-m (LGCP30)

Moderators: Prasad Thenkabail, U.S. Geological Survey and Russell Congalton, University of New Hampshire
2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 1
This special session will present and discuss the world’s first Landsat-derived 30-m global cropland products @ 30-m (LGCP30). The focus will be on Landsat-derived global cropland extent @ 30-m (LGCE30) (https://croplands.org/app/map). This product maps the entire world’s 1.8 billion hectares of croplands at 30-m resolution. The presentations in the session will discuss methods and approaches used in LGCE30. Cropland mapping algorithms (CMAs) including several machine learning algorithms (MLAs) were used on 2-3 years of 16-day Landsat data cubes to derive LGCE30 using Google Earth Engine (GEE) cloud computing. Cropland areas computed for every country in the world as well as cropland areas of sub-national administrative boundaries will be discussed and compared with conventional statistics. Exhaustive discussions on accuracies, errors, and uncertainties will take place- providing error matrices with overall-producer’s, user’s, and weighted overall accuracies of some 80+ zones of the world.

Global 30-m Cropland Extent Map for the Nominal Year 2015: Derived Using Landsat-8 Time-series Data and Machine Learning Algorithms Computed on Google Earth Engine Cloud
Prasad Thenkabail, U.S. Geological Survey
Evaluating the Performance of Various Sampling Strategies Used to Assess the Accuracy of Large Area Crop Maps
Russell Congalton, University of New Hampshire
Linnea Dwyer and Kamini Yadav
An Automated Crop Intensity Algorithm (ACIA) for Global Cropland Intensity Mapping at Nominal 30-m Using Landsat-8 and Sentinel-2 Time-Series Data and Google Earth Engine
Jun Xiong, U.S. Geological Survey
Prasad Thenkabail, Pardhasaradhi Teluguntla, Adam Oliphant, Russell Congalton, Murali Krishna Gumma, Kamini Yadav, Richard Massey, and Corryn Smith
Mapping Cropland Extent and Areas of Australia at 30-m Resolution Using Multi-year Time-series Landsat Data and Random Forest Machine Learning Algorithm Through Google Earth Engine (GEE) Cloud Computing
Pardhasaradhi Teluguntla, U.S. Geological Survey
Prasad Thenkabail, Jun Xiong, Adam Oliphant, Murali Krishna Gumma, Russell Congalton, Kamini Yadav, Richard Massey, Aparna Phalke, Jim Tilton, and Corryn Smith
Mapping Croplands of Southeast Asia, Japan, and North and South Korea Using Landsat 30-m Time-Series, Random Forest Algorithm
Adam Oliphant, U.S. Geological Survey
Prasad Thenkabail, Pardhasaradhi Teluguntla, Russell Congalton, Kamini Yadav, Murali Krishna Gumma, Jun Xiong, Richard Massey, and Corryn Smiths

TS #2—Special Session

Landsat Archive, Product Plans, and Data Continuity

Moderator: Jennifer Lacey, U.S. Geological Survey

2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 6

Landsat represents the world’s longest continuously acquired collection of space-based moderate-resolution land remote sensing data. The Landsat program has taken several actions to expand the USGS archive holdings, further the science use, and ensure Landsat data continuity. Through the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation Project and increased satellite acquisitions, archive holdings have reached over 7 million scenes. This special session includes five topics that provide an archive status, science data product status and plans, and future mission plans for continuing Landsat’s irreplaceable record.
Ensuring Proper Storage for Earth Science Data Used for Decisions: The USGS Process to Certify Trusted Digital Repositories
John Faundeen, U.S. Geological Survey
Clara Brown and Keith Kirk
Landsat Archive Status and the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation
Kristi Kline, U.S. Geological Survey
Landsat Collections and Future Landsat Standard Product Plans
Brian Sauer, U.S. Geological Survey
Continuity and Improvements with Landsat 9
Jim Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey
An Outlook for Sustainable Land Imaging at the USGS Land Remote Sensing Program
Peter Doucette, U.S. Geological Survey

TS #3—Panel Session

Creating a Healthy Remote Sensing Education Pipeline:  Moving from K-12 to University

Moderator: Lindi Quackenbush, State University of New York, Environmental Science and Forestry

2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 8

The remote sensing field is growing and changing rapidly.  Deployment of novel sensors requires greater prerequisite knowledge and development of new processing methods. In order to ensure we have a well-trained workforce able to advance this field, we need to create a pipeline of students who can engage in advanced study in remote sensing.  There are a wide range of activities that can be used to facilitate development of interest and skills at an early level to support advanced undergraduate or graduate study and stimulate interest in remote sensing as both art and science. This session will bring together panelists from members of the AmericaView consortium to present their experiences in a range of pipeline topics including K-12 outreach, service learning, STEM literacy, and curriculum development.
Panelists:
Lindi Quackenbush, State University of New York, Environmental Science and Forestry
Ken Boykin, New Mexico State University
James Campbell, Virginia Tech
Amber Imai-Hong, Hawaii Space Grant Consortium, University of Hawaii-Manoa
JB Sharma, University of North Georgia
Chandi Witharana, University of Connecticut
Brent Yantis, University of Louisiana-Lafayette

TS #4—Special Session

Great Lakes Remote Sensing

Moderator: Brandon Krumwiede, The Baldwin Group

2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 10

The Great Lakes represents about 20% of the world’s available surface freshwater.  When the Polar ice caps and Greenland glaciers melt into the ocean, the percentage approaches 50% (assuming the volume does not change) making the Great Lakes a substantial global resource to manage for future generations.  This session will highlight a few unique remote sensing approaches for the Great Lakes Basin which will more accurately characterize changes over time at a sub-meter scale using a variety of sensors.  The long-term challenge is how to integrate approaches across borders to provide systematic daily multi-sensor views of the Great Lakes Basin.
An Overview of the Binational Great Lakes Wetlands Remote Sensing Project
Brian Huberty, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
Brian Brisco, Sarah Banks, Jennifer Corcoran, Jim Klassen, Keith Pelletier, Paul Morin, Laura Chavez, Mike Battaglia, and Joe Knight
High Resolution Optical and Radar Mapping and Monitoring of Coastal Great Lakes Wetlands to Inform Wetland Management Decisions
Laura Bourgeau-Chavez, Michigan Technological University
Michael Battaglia, Colin Brooks, Brian Huberty, Sarah Endres, and Brian Brisco
Creating High Temporal Frequency Digital Surface Models in the Great Lakes Basin
James Klassen, SharedGeo
Dynamic Watercourse Hydrography Updating in Minnesota’s Lake Superior Coastal Watersheds
Jennifer Corcoran, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

TS #5

Snow and Ice

Moderator: Gabriel Senay, U.S. Geological Survey

2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 11

Global Land Ice Velocity Extraction (GoLIVE) from Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2a/b
Ted Scambos, National Snow and Ice Data Center, CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder
Mark Fahnestock, Alex Gardner, Marin Klinger, Twila Moon, and Terry Haran
Validation of Landsat 8 OLI and MODIS Aqua Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Reflectance Using Airborne Spectrometry
Christopher Crawford, U.S. Geological Survey
Monitoring the Breakup of Sea Ice in the Beaufort Sea using Multi-Sensor Satellite-derived Time-series Data
Tracy DeLiberty, University of Delaware
Hierarchical Knowledge Based Classification (HKBC) on Sentinel-2A Data for Glacier Mapping of Bhaga River Basin, Northwest Himalaya
Aayushi Pandey, Amity Institute of Geoinformatics & Remote Sensing, Amity University, Noida, Uttar Pradesh
Aman Rai, Sharad Gupta, and Dericks Shukla
Global Snow Cover Trend Analysis using Cloud-based Geospatial Analysis Engine
Xingong Li, University of Kansas

TS #6

Deforestation and Forest Fragmentation

Moderator: Randolph Wynne, Virginia Tech

2:15 pm to 3:45 pm—Room 13

Implementation of a New Spectral Vegetation Index within Google Earth Engine for Automated Forest Loss Mapping
Lloyd L. Coulter, San Diego State University
Kellie A. Uyeda, and Douglas A. Stow
Landsat-Scale Trends of Above-Ground Biomass Across Mexico from 1984-2015
Damien Sulla-Menashe, Boston University
Alessandro Baccini, Wayne Walker, Curtis Woodcock, and Chris Holden
Soy Moratorium Impacts on Soybean And Deforestation Dynamics In Mato Grosso, Brazil
Jude Kastens, University of Kansas
Chris Brown, Alex Coutinho, Chris Bishop, and Julio Esquerdo
Mapping Long-Term Tree Cover Dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa Using Socio-Ecological Geospatial Data
Michael Marshall, Department of Natural Resources, University of Twente
Remote Sensing Time-Series Analysis of Forest Fragmentation and Connectivity in Virginia
Iris Fynn, Virginia Tech
James Campbell

TS #7—Special Session

Evolution of Global Land Cover Mapping: History and New Developments

Moderator: Zhiliang Zhu and Brad Reed, U.S. Geological Survey

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 1

Land cover maps of the world from paper media to digital formats have been produced over the millennium. These products featured prominently in the development of the world we know today, and the research and development of global land cover maps are still a critical scientific endeavor in our continued effort to understand the world better. In the recent history, a variety of well-known global land cover maps or databases have been developed using advanced remote sensing methods, which having given the scientific community important lessons learned from the development of the products and findings from applications of the land cover information. This session is designed as a unique forum for scientists who have played a role in developing and advancing the field of global land cover mapping to review the history of the development, highlight recent achievements, discuss key issues and knowledge gaps still facing us today, and providing outlooks for future science needs. The audience will learn about global land cover mapping history, recent developments, theoretical treatments, methodology reviews, applications, and global collaborations.
Reflections on the IGBP DISCover Global Land Cover Project
Thomas Loveland, U.S. Geological Survey
Jesslyn Brown, Bradley Reed, Zhiliang Zhu, Limin Yang, and Donald Ohlen
Landsat Gone Global, Going Global, Still Going…
Alan Belward, Joint Research Centre, European Commission
Noel Gorelick, Jean-Francois Pekel, and Andrew Cottam
A Strategy for Global Land Cover Monitoring Using Landsat and Sentinel 2
Matthew Hansen, University of Maryland
A Brief and Personal History of Global Land-Cover Data: Have We  Evolved from Too Little to Too Much?
Elaine Matthews, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Automated Global Land Cover Mapping From-Glc-2 and a New Mapping Portal in Support of Flexible Mapping With Landsat Data
Peng Gong, Tsinghua University
Congcong Li, Jie Wang, Luyan Ji, Yuqi Bai, Huabing Huang, Le Yu, Duole Feng, Yuanyuan Zhao, Greg Biging, Nick Clinton, and Zhiliang Zhu,

TS #8—Special Session

Calibration of Satellite Imagery

Moderator:  Dennis Helder, U.S. Geological Survey

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 6
Calibration of satellite imagery is the necessary first step before data users can extract useful, quantifiable information from the imagery.  Thus, it is paramount that the calibration step achieve an accuracy and precision that significantly exceeds that required by the applications derived from satellite imagery.  Calibration is normally divided into geometric calibration and radiometric calibration – essentially putting the pixels in the right place and giving them the right value.  In this session both types of calibration will be addressed from a variety of perspectives.  Status and improvements for calibration of various sensor types will be discussed, and insights will be given on new calibration approaches that promise improved accuracy for optical sensors in both the reflective and thermal regions.
Augmented Two Line Elements for Landsat Ephemeris Data
Mark Lubke, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Ajit Sampath
Geometric Verification Algorithm (GVERIFY) to Validate the Accuracy of Landsat Multispectral Scanner and Thematic Mapper Data
Mark Lubke, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Ajit Sampath
Lifetime Temporal Validation and Absolute Calibration of the EO-1 Hyperion Sensor
Xin Jing, South Dakota State University
Compact Thermal Imager Calibrator (CTIC) for Landsat-like Missions
Mary Pagnutti, Innovative Imaging & Research
Kara Burch and Robert Ryan
Landsat-8 Thermal Infrared Sensor Radiometric Calibration Status
Julia Barsi, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Brian Markham, Simon Hook, John Schott, Nina Raqueno, and Emmett Lentilucci
Ground-based Artificial Light Source Radiometric Calibration of the VIIRS Day-Night Band High Gain Stage Early Results
Robert Ryan, Innovative Imaging & Research
Timothy Ruggles, Kara Burch, Larry Leigh, Mary Pagnutti, and Dennis Helder

TS #9—Panel Session

Training Next Generation Remote Sensing Scientists

Moderator: Rebecca Dodge, Midwestern State University

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 8

From cloud computing to no-cost Landsat data and low-cost data collected from Unmanned Aircraft Systems, remote sensing technology is changing faster than ever before at a time when the need for a highly trained and adaptive geospatial workforce is perhaps greater than ever. In this session, StateView panelists from AmericaView, a nationwide consortium dedicated to remote sensing research, outreach, and education, will share their successes in building the remote sensing workforce of tomorrow through a network of undergraduate research opportunities. StateViews may focus research on state-specific issues important to local and regional stakeholders, such as urban expansion, coastal studies, forestry, agriculture, or grazing; international research applications are also available.   Panelists will share lessons learned as well as valuable insights about recruiting, training, and mentoring undergraduate students on data processing, information extraction, and presentation skills.  This will be followed by a Q&A and discussion session.
Panelists:
Rebecca Dodge, Robert L. Bolin Graduate School of Petroleum Geology
Larry Biehl, Purdue University
Jarlath O’Neil-Dunne, University of Vermont
Ramesh Sivanpillai, University of Wyoming
Yong Wang, East Carolina University

TS #10

Floods, Faults and Other Hazards

Moderator: Jude Kastens, University of Kansas

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 10

Rapid Flood Mapping Using Inundation Libraries
Jude Kastens, University of Kansas
Kevin Dobbs, James Halgren and Brian Ashe
Automated Mapping of Flood Events in the Mississippi River Basin Utilizing NASA Earth Observations
Mercedes Bartkovich,  Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Nicholas McVey, Helen Baldwin, Olivia Callaway, Dashiell Cruz, and Chris Ploetz
Using Landsat 8 to Map the Geomorphology and Structural Geology of Northwestern Venezuela
Tyler Ricketts, University of Mississippi
Employing Web Services and Large-scale Automation to Provide Greater Accessibility to Decision Makers.
Jennifer Martin, Satelytics

TS #11

Water and Air Quality

Moderator: Nima Pahlevan, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 11

Regional Water Quality Measurements of Optically Complex Inland Waters Using New Enhanced Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 Imagery
Leif Olmanson, University of Minnesota
Patrick Brezonik, Marvin Bauer, and Jacques Finlay
Landsat-Sentinel-2 for Aquatic Science: Steps Towards Transitioning from Research to Operations
Nima Pahlevan, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Sudipta Sarkar, Sandeep Chittimalli, and Sundarabalan Subramanian
Leveraging Landsat to Map Lake Water Quality for Improved Public Health Decision-making
Nathan Torbick, Applied GeoSolutions
Monitoring Air Quality in Shenandoah National Park to Address National Park Service Initiatives Using NASA Earth Observations
Ellen Bubak, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Julie Terhune, Nicholas Lenfant, Douglas Gardiner, and Amanda Clayton

TS #12

Fire and Fuel Loads

Moderator: Birgit Peterson, U.S. Geological Survey

4:00 pm to 5:30 pm—Room 13

LANDFIRE Remap: Integrating Lidar for Improving Vegetation Structure Mapping
Jordan Long, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Birgit Peterson, and Kurtis Nelson
Disturbance Mapping Improvements for LANDFIRE Remap
Brian Tolk, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Near Real-Time Monitoring of Wildfire Fuel Conditions in the Great Basin/Southwest U.S.
Kurtis Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey
Development of a Landsat-8 Sentinel-2 30 m Burned Area Product
David Roy, South Dakota State University
Haiyan Huang, Luigi Boschetti, Hankui Zhang, Lin Yan, and Zhongbin Li,
Utilizing NASA Earth Observations and Google Earth Engine to Map Historical Tree Mortality in Lassen Volcanic National Park
Anna McGarrigle, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
John Dilger, and Joshua Verkerke

Social Event

Exhibitors’ Reception

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm—Exhibit Hall 2

Take this wonderful opportunity to visit with the national and international suppliers exhibiting at the Symposium. An ASPRS tradition, the Exhibitors’ Reception is a perfect time to mingle with fellow attendees, thank the Conference Exhibitors’, our hosts for the evening, and stop by to view the wonderful Posters on display and interact with the authors. The evening is sure to provide a relaxed environment with light hors d’oeuvres and beverages and a time to come together with old and new friends.
Admission to this event is included with most registrations.

Posters Sessions

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm—Exhibit Hall 2
Take time to view the various posters on display and speak with the presenter. Poster presenters are asked to be near their work at this time and available to answer questions and expand on their research. In addition, poster presenters are requested to be near their poster during lunch breaks, as their schedule allows. Posters will be on display throughout the conference and open for viewing.

Wednesday

Plenary Sessions

Current State of Earth Observations—Panel Discussion

Moderator: Barbara J. Ryan, Secretariat Director of the intergovernmental Group on Earth Observations (GEO)
8:30 am to 10:00 am
Michael H. Freilich, Director, Earth Science Division at NASA Headquarters
Dr. Freilich is the Director of NASA’s Earth Science Division.

The purpose of NASA’s Earth science program is to develop a scientific understanding of Earth’s system and its response to natural or human-induced changes, and to improve prediction of climate, weather, and natural hazards.  A major component of NASA’s Earth Science Division is a coordinated series of satellite and airborne missions for long-term global observations of the land surface, biosphere, solid Earth, atmosphere, and oceans. This coordinated approach enables an improved understanding of the Earth as an integrated system.  Prior to coming to NASA, he was a Professor and Associate Dean in the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. He received BS degrees in Physics (Honors) and Chemistry from Haverford College in 1975 and a Ph.D. in Oceanography from Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1982.  Dr. Freilich’s honors include the JPL Director’s Research Achievement Award (1988), the NASA Public Service Medal (1999), and the American Meteorological Society’s Verner E. Suomi Award (2004), as well as several NASA Group Achievement awards.  He was named a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society in 2004.

Harry A. Cikanek – Director (acting), STAR – Center for Satellite Applications and Research, NOAA

Mr. Cikanek is the acting Director for the United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), the unit of the NOAA Satellite and Information Service responsible for transforming raw and intermediate satellite data flows from NOAA and global observing system satellites into real time weather and environmental data and information products. These feed forecast models, and operations personnel in the National Weather          Service, National Ocean Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and support research, and long term environmental information products to meet NOAA’s and its partner weather and environmental information needs to protect life, property and livelihoods.  Prior to this assignment, he served just over five years as the first Director of the NOAA Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). His major JPSS accomplishments included stabilizing and streamlining the program to tighten its focus on the weather mission while avoiding over $2 billion in cost. He oversaw the successful transition of the Suomi National Polar Partnership (the first JPSS mission) satellite to NOAA operations and its continued successful operations in support of the NOAA weather mission. Mr. Cikanek began his career as a NASA aerospace engineer. His 30 years at NASA included engineering and program management in rocket propulsion, launch services, space transportation technology, and human exploration of space. He is the author or coauthor of over 25 papers and articles. He is also a recipient of the Presidential Rank of Meritorious Executive, the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal, and is an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

William Werkheiser, Acting Director, USGS (invited)

Mr. Werkheiser has served in numerous positions since joining the USGS in 1986. Prior to his position as Associate Director for Water, he was the Regional Director for the former USGS Eastern Region, where he oversaw activities related to biological, geographical, geological, and hydrological research and assessments.  He also led the Natural Hazards Initiative Team and the long-term Hurricane Katrina Response and Recovery Team for the USGS. He has over 25 years of experience with the USGS and other agencies working on a variety of environmental and scientific issues.
Walter S. Scott, Founder and CTO, DigitalGlobe (invited)

Dr. Scott is the founder and currently serves as the Executive Vice President and Chief Technical Officer at DigitalGlobe. He is responsible for DigitalGlobe’s Platform and Services Business Units, as well as space system acquisition. From 1986 through 1992, Dr. Scott held a number of technical, program, and department management positions at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, including serving as the assistant associate director of the Physics Department. Prior to this, he served as president of Scott Consulting, a Unix systems and applications consulting firm. Dr. Scott holds a Bachelor of Arts in Applied Mathematics, magna cum laude, from Harvard College and a Doctorate and Master of Science in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

TS #13

LCMAP Special Session 1: Foundations

Moderator: Curtis Woodcock, Boston University

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 1

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long land cover history, starting with the 1976 landmark A Land Use and Land Cover Classification System for use with Remote Sensor Data and including global land cover mapping and the ongoing production of the National Land Cover Database.  While these past projects have had a significant impact, land cover data needs are changing due to the demand for increasingly innovative and timely land cover products needed to meet the community’s insatiable appetite for science-quality geospatial land cover and land change data.  Recent research on the use of the unprecedented depth of the Landsat archive has resulted in the potential to generate higher quality results that include additional land cover variables, more detailed legends, and more frequent land cover and land change geospatial and statistical information. To capitalize on new capabilities, the USGS is working closely with researchers from Boston University and Texas Tech University to implement the Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) initiative.  LCMAP is envisioned as an end-to-end capability that uses the rich Landsat record to continuously track and characterize changes in land cover, use, and condition and translate such information into assessments of current and historical processes of cover and change. LCMAP aims to generate science-quality land cover and land change products from current and near-real time Landsat data. All available Landsat data for any given location are used to characterize land cover and change at any point across the full Landsat record and to detect and characterize land cover and land change as it occurs.
Three special sessions will: 1) lay out the foundations of LCMAP; 2) review the initial progress toward developing a new generation of land cover and land change products; and 3) examine how these new products are addressing land change applications.
Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP): Expanding the Understanding and Management of Land Change
Thomas Loveland, U.S. Geological Survey
John Dwyer and Curtis Woodcock
Large Area Annual Land Cover Maps Derived from Analysis Ready Landsat Time Series Data
Zhe Zhu, Texas Tech University
Analysis Ready Data: Reconditioning the Landsat Archive to Support Time Series Investigations
John Dwyer, U.S. Geological Survey
Thomas Loveland and Calli Jenkerson
Collection of National Land Cover and Land Change Reference Data for a 30+ Year Time Series Accuracy Assessment
Bruce Pengra, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Warren Cohen, Todd Schroeder, Sean Healey, Stephen Stehman, and Zhiqiang Yang
Accuracy Assessment and Area Estimation for Annual Land-Cover Monitoring
Stephen Stehman, State University of New York
Thomas Loveland, and Bruce Pengra

TS #14

Landsat/Sentinel Cross-Calibration Session 1

Moderator: Brian Markham, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 6

Cross-Calibration of Landsat 8 OLI and Sentinel 2 MSI and its Impact On Data Interoperability–Workshop Results and Analysis
Dennis Helder, U.S. Geological Survey
Operational Sentinel-2A L1C and Landsat-8 Collection-1 Time-series Registration
Lin Yan, South Dakota State University
David Roy, Haiyan Huang, Zhongbin Li, and Hankui Zhang
Improving Landsat-8/Sentinel-2 Registration Accuracy
James Storey, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Michael Choate, Rajagopalan Rengarajan, and Mark Lubke
Utilization of TanDEM-X and ALOS DEM for Topographic Correction of Sentinel-2 Satellite Imagery
Sharad Kumar Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology, Mandi
Dericks Praise Shukla
A Small Satellite Piggy-Back Calibrator (PBR) Enabling Accurate Absolute Radiometric Calibration
Mary (Becky) Cudzilo, Surrey Satellite Technology US LLC
Uncertainty of the TOA Radiance predicted by MODTRAN-5 using Monte Carlo Simulation
Cibele Teixeira Pinto, South Dakota State University
Ruy Morgado de Castro, Larry Leigh, and Dennis Helder

TS #15—Panel Session

Petascale High Performance Computing

Moderator: Steve Swazee, GITA Executive Director/SharedGeo

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 8

With the growth of daily commercial, higher resolution, optical and radar satellite systems to the explosion of centimeter level cameras on Unmanned Aerial Systems, the question is not can one get imagery but how can one handle it all?  Petascale High Performance Computing is a major emerging technology system that has bypassed traditional remote sensing computer workstation approaches. This panel is designed to facilitate a broad discussion of where the industry is today and where it is going in the future.  The panelists represent a cross section of academic, business, and government sectors.
Panelists:
Chris Doescher, U.S. Geological Survey
Lanny Faleide, Satshot.com
Mark Korver, Amazon Web Services
Paul Morin, University of Minnesota
Joel Schlagel, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

TS #16

Landcover and Landcover Change

Moderator: Kristi Sayler, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 11

Unlocking Landsat’s Landscape Narratives: Landcover in the Cloud
Robert Kennedy, Oregon State University
Justin Braaten, Sam Hooper, Joseph Hughes, Zhiqiang Yang, and Peder Nelson
Multi-algorithm Sequencing for Land Cover Change Monitoring
Eric Bullock, Boston University
Curtis Woodcock
A Polyalgorithm for Land Cover Trend and Change Detection
Rishu Saxena, Virginia Tech
Layne Watson, Randolph Wynne, and Valerie Thomas
The Time Series Global Land Surface Satellite (GLASS) products
Shunlin Liang, University of Maryland
Mapping Smallholder Forest Plantation Dynamics in Andhra Pradesh using Multitemporal, Mulitresolution Earth Resource Satellite Data
Randolph Wynne, Virginia Tech
Valerie Thomas, Evan Brooks, Jill Derwin, Gregory Amacher, Kelly Cobourn, Haripriya Gundimeda, Matthew House, Paige Williams, Sara Cerv, James Rakestraw, and Rishu Saxena

TS #17

Bathymetry and Shoreline Mapping

Moderator: Vaughn Ihlen, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 10

Active-Passive Data Fusion for Global, Nearshore Bathymetry Retrieval
Nick Forfinski-Sarkozi, Oregon State University
Christopher Parrish
Evaluating the Potential for Near-Shore Bathymetry on the Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands, Using Landsat 8 and WorldView-3 imagery
Sandra Poppenga, U.S. Geological Survey
Best Practices for Use of Remote Sensing Derived Elevation Models in Sea-Level Rise Assessments
Dean Gesch, U.S. Geological Survey
WorldDEM Ocean Shoreline Validation and Verification
Michael Caruso, University of Miami
Hans Graber, Ernest Fahrland, John Collins, and John Hargrove
Structure-From-Motion Derived Historical Orthomosaics and their Applications
Lisa Wirth, University of Alaska

TS #18

Forest Canopy Height and Structure

Moderator: Valerie Thomas, Virginia Tech

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 13

Large-Area Site Index Maps Using Disparate Lidar Datasets and Landsat Data for Better Planted Pine Forest Management
Randolph Wynne, Virginia Tech
Jobriath Kauffman, Valerie Thomas, and Randolph Wynne
Using Lidar to Inform Management of Minnesota’s Aspen and Red Pine Forests
George Host, University of Minnesota-Duluth
Kristina Nixon, Paul Meysembourg, William Berguson, and Daniel Buchman
Land Cover Classification of the Lake of the Woods/Rainy River Basin by Object-Based Image Analysis of Landsat and Lidar Data
Leif Olmanson, University of Minnesota
Marvin Bauer
Integrating Airborne Lidar and Landsat Data to Quantify Forest Aboveground Biomass Amount and Uncertainty
Lindi Quackenbush, State University of New York, Environmental Science and Forestry
Siqi Li
Tree Height Estimation in Sloped Plateau Area with Dual-Polarization InSAR Techniques and Datasets
Yong Wang, East Carolina University, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China
Huimin Li

Plenary Sessions

Presentation of the 2017 William T. Pecora Award

Michael H. Freilich, NASA and Andrea Travnicek, DOI (invited)

1:30 pm to 3:00 pm

The William T. Pecora Award is presented annually to individuals or groups that make outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing. The award is sponsored jointly by the Department of the Interior (DOI) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
Perspectives on Progress and Challenges in Remote Sensing—Panel Discussion
Panelist—Pecora Award Winners

Samuel N. Goward (2008)
Dr. Goward pursues biophysical applications of land remotely sensed data. He has been actively involved in the land observation missions since the 1970s, specifically focused on Landsat and AVHRR. His recent research has focused on evaluating North American forest disturbance and regrowth from the historical Landsat observation record for the North American Carbon Program (NACP). He currently is serving as a member of the NACP science steering group. He served as the Landsat Science Team Leader for Landsat 7 and continues as a member of the Landsat Science Team today. In addition he served as the Co-Chair for the USGS National Land Satellite Land Remote Sensing Data Archive (NLSLRSDA) advisory committee. In recognition of his long-standing commitment to land observations and the Landsat mission, Dr. Goward has received the USGS John Wesley Powell award, the USGS/NASA William T. Pecora award and the ASPRS SAIC Estes Teaching award. He continues to serve as an associate editor for Remote Sensing of Environment.

Curtis E. Woodcock (2016)
Dr. Woodcock has held academic positions at the University of California, the City University of New York and Boston University. His primary research interests are: the use of remote sensing to monitor land change, including topics of time series analysis, cloud/cloud shadow detection, and validation of time series results;      terrestrial carbon dynamics; the causes and consequences of land cover and land use change. Dr. Woodcock was the 2016 William T. Pecora Award winner for “outstanding contributions toward understanding the Earth by means of remote sensing.” He was the co-team leader for the Landsat Science Team.

Darrel L. Williams (2017)
Dr. Williams joined Global Science and Technology as their Chief Scientist in February 2010 upon retiring from a distinguished 35-year career in NASA.  At NASA he conducted remote sensing research to develop enhanced techniques for assessing terrestrial ecosystems worldwide.  Over time he assumed science management positions of increasing responsibility, including international field campaign manager, Branch Head, Landsat Project Scientist, and Laboratory Associate and Acting Chief.  He worked with and mentored several EOS-era Project Scientists (Terra, Aqua, ICESat, NMP Earth Observer-1, Landsat Data Continuity Mission, etc.), and received NASA medals for Outstanding Leadership (1997) and Exceptional Service (2000).  In 1999 Williams received the “Aviation Week and Space Technology 1999 Laurels Award” for outstanding achievement in the field of Space in recognition of his science leadership role for the Landsat 7 mission.  In 2006 he received an “Outstanding Alumni Award” from the School of Forest Resources at the Pennsylvania State University where he received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Forest Science in 1973 and 1974, respectively. Williams attained his Ph.D. in Physical Geography from the University of Maryland in 1989.

TS #19

LCMAP Special Session 2: Initial Results

Moderator: Virginia Burkett, U.S. Geological Survey

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 1

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long land cover history, starting with the 1976 landmark A Land Use and Land Cover Classification System for use with Remote Sensor Data and including global land cover mapping and the ongoing production of the National Land Cover Database.  While these past projects have had a significant impact, land cover data needs are changing due to the demand for increasingly innovative and timely land cover products needed to meet the community’s insatiable appetite for science-quality geospatial land cover and land change data.  Recent research on the use of the unprecedented depth of the Landsat archive has resulted in the potential to generate higher quality results that include additional land cover variables, more detailed legends, and more frequent land cover and land change geospatial and statistical information. To capitalize on new capabilities, the USGS is working closely with researchers from Boston University and Texas Tech University to implement the Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) initiative.  LCMAP is envisioned as an end-to-end capability that uses the rich Landsat record to continuously track and characterize changes in land cover, use, and condition and translate such information into assessments of current and historical processes of cover and change. LCMAP aims to generate science-quality land cover and land change products from current and near-real time Landsat data. All available Landsat data for any given location are used to characterize land cover and change at any point across the full Landsat record and to detect and characterize land cover and land change as it occurs.
Three special sessions will: 1) lay out the foundations of LCMAP; 2) review the initial progress toward developing a new generation of land cover and land change products; and 3) examine how these new products are addressing land change applications.
A New Generation of U.S. Land-Cover Products
Christopher Barber, ASRC Federal Inuteq
Alisa Gallant, George Xian, Qiang Zhou, and Bruce Pengra
A New Generation of U.S. Land Change Products
Jim Vogelmann, U.S. Geological Survey
A New Generation of Land Change Products: Implications for Studying              Carbon Stocks and Fluxes in the Pacific Northwest
Benjamin Sleeter, U.S. Geological Survey
Jinxun Liu, Zhiliang Zhu, Alisa Gallant, Jim Vogelmann, Thomas Loveland, and Christopher Soulard
Deconstructing Developed and Forested Areas in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed
Peter Claggett, U.S. Geological Survey
Comparing Land Cover Trends Project’s Normalized Annual Change and LCMAP’s Annual Change in the Puget Lowland Ecoregion
Roger Auch, U.S. Geological Survey
Kristi Sayler, Stephen Stehman, Bruce Pengra, and Janis Taylor
Forest Harvest Patterns in the Cascade Mountains, Washington, 1985-2014
Christopher Soulard, U.S. Geological Survey
Jessica Walker

TS #20

Landsat/Sentinel Cross-Calibration Session 2

Moderator: Jim Storey, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 6

Refined Absolute PICS Calibration Model Over Libya-4 using Sentinel2A and Landsat 8 Collection-1 data for Validation
Morakot Kaewmanee, South Dakota State University
Dennis Helder
SMACAA Atmospheric Code for BRDF Retrieval and APICS First Principles Methodology as Applied Imaging Satellite Sensor Calibration
Larry Leigh, South Dakota State University
Leah Ervin, and Dennis Helder
Large Area Saharan PICS Development for Calibration and Stability Monitoring of Optical Satellite Sensors
Mahesh Shrestha, South Dakota State University
Larry Leigh, Dennis Helder, and Thomas Loveland
Endmember-Based Aerosol Inversion Technique for the Atmospheric Correction of Landsat OLI
Minsu Kim, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager: Relative Gain Estimation Using Unbiased Global Earth Imaging
Md Obaidul Haque, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Julia Barsi, Dennis Helder, and Esad Micijevic
Landsat-8 OLI On-Orbit Radiometric Performance and Landsat-9 OLI-2 Radiometric Performance Predictions
Brian Markham, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Julia Barsi, Ron Morfitt, Ed Kaita, Md Obaidul Haque, Lawrence Ong, Phil Dabney, Jeffrey Pedelty, Raviv Levy, and Esad Micijevic

TS #21

Agriculture and Drought

Moderator: Rick Mueller, U.S. Department of Agriculture

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 8

Estimating Excess Moisture Conditions with Earth Observation Data
Catherine Champagne, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Vigor and Evapotranspiration of Soybean Grown Under Different Management Systems Monitored by Landsat
Anita Simic Milas, Bowling Green State University
Validation of MinNDTI Method for Remote Sensing of Crop Residue and Tillage Practices Using Multi-Temporal Landsat 8 and Sentinel-2 Imagery
Michael Graham, Virginia Tech
James Campbell, Baojuan Zheng, Craig Daughtry, Yang Shao, and Megan O’Rourke
Investigating Patterns of Drought Influence on Land Use and Land Cover in the Great Plains with Landsat Time Series Data
Heather Tollerud, U.S. Geological Survey
Jesslyn Brown and Thomas Loveland
Assessing the Impact of Drought in Guanacaste, Costa Rica and  Evaluating Potential Contributions of ECOSTRESS Evapotranspiration Data to Improve Drought Estimation
Savannah Cooley, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

TS #22

Landcover Classification Algorithms

Moderator: David Roy, South Dakota State University

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 10

Using the 500 m MODIS Land Cover Product to Derive a Consistent North America 30 m Landsat Land Cover Classification and Implications for Global 30 m Land Cover Mapping
Hankui Zhang, South Dakota State University
David Roy
The Rapid Land Cover Mapper: A Useful Alternative for High Resolution and Small Scale Land Study
Ross Evelsizer, Northeast Iowa Resource Conservation & Development
Darrell Napton, and Suzanne Cotillon
Reusing Low-Accuracy and Variable-Accuracy Land-Cover Maps for Automatic Forest/Non-Forest Classification
Peter Kennedy, University of Lethbridge
Craig Coburn
A Hybrid Approach to Realistically Downscaling Land Use Patterns
Evan B Brooks, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
John W. Coulston, Kurt H Riitters, and David N Wear
Estimating and Mapping Individual Pixel Accuracy for Classified Remote Sensing Images
Giorgos Mountrakis, State University of New York
Reza Khatami, and Steve Stehman

TS # 23

Evapotranspiration for Water Management

Moderator: Martha Anderson, U.S. Department of Agriculture

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 11

A Review of Remote Sensing of Evapotranspiration Models for Agricultural Water Resources Management
Hatim Geli, New Mexico State University
Christopher Neale, and James Verdin
Analysis of Satellite-Based Water Use Dynamics Using Historical Landsat Data (1984-2014) in the Southwestern United States
Gabriel Senay, U.S. Geological Survey
Matthew Schauer, MacKenzie Friedrichs, Naga Manohar Velpuri, and Ramesh Singh
An Intercomparison of Evapotranspiration Estimates Derived Using Thermal-Based Satellite Remote Sensing for Irrigation Management in California Vineyards
Kyle Knipper, U.S. Department of Agriculture
William Kustas, Martha Anderson, Joseph Alfieri, John Prueger, Feng Gao, Lynn McKee, Lawrence Hipps, and Maria Mar Alsina
Investigating Impacts of Drought and Disturbance on a Forested Landscape in North Carolina, USA using High Spatiotemporal Resolution Evapotranspiration Datacubes
Yun Yang, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Martha Anderson, Feng Gao, Christopher Hain, William Kustas, Asko Noormets, Ge Sun, Randolph Wynne, and Valerie Thomas
An Open Source Tool To Estimate Regional And Field-Scale ET For Decision Makers
Mitchell Schull, University of Maryland
Chris Hain, Martha Anderson, Xiwu Zhan, and Christopher Neale

TS #24

Forest Mapping and Insect Damage

Moderator: Robert Kennedy, Oregon State University

3:30 pm to 5:00 pm—Room 13

Using Landsat Time Series to Improve Mapping of Forest Composition and Condition in the Northeastern United States
Valerie Pasquarella, University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Using Landsat to Assess the Extent and Severity of Forest Defoliation from Gypsy Moth Larvae in Eastern Connecticut Forests
James Hurd, University of Connecticut
Chandi Witharana, Daniel Civco, and Jason Parent
A Multi-Index Landsat-Derived Model for Spruce Budworm Defoliation  Detection and Quantification: Examples of Past and Current Outbreaks (1970s and 2000s)
Parinaz Rahimzadeh, University of Maine
Aaron Weiskittel, Daniel Kneeshaw, and David MacLean
Analyzing and Mapping Landscape Disturbance Across Glacier National Park Using a Landsat Time Series
Antonio Alvarado, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Ryan Avery, Charlotte Mays, Suzannah Richards, Zachary Wardle, Joseph Harris, Sunita Yadav-Pauletti, Jordan Lubbers, and Jemiris Gonzalez-de Jesus
Wavelet-Based Multisensor Data Fusion Aided by Temporal Analysis
Sherin Ghannam, Virginia Tech
A. Lynn Abbott, Mohamed Hussein, Randolph Wynne, Valerie Thomas, and James Campbell

Special Event

Landsat’s Enduring Legacy Book Unveiling

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm— Exhibit Hall 2

Join us at a special evening session for the unveiling of the Landsat Legacy book and take the opportunity to meet the book’s authors.  After more than 15 years of research and writing, the Landsat Legacy Project Team and the ASPRS have published a seminal work on the nearly half-century of monitoring Earth’s lands with Landsat.  Born of technologies that evolved from the Second World War, Landsat not only pioneered global land monitoring, in the process it also drove innovation in digital imaging technologies and encouraged development of global imagery archives. Access to this imagery led to early breakthroughs in natural resources assessments, particularly for agriculture, forestry, and geology.  With the emergence of twenty-first century Earth system science research, the full value of the Landsat concept and its continuous 45-year global archive has only recently been recognized and embraced.  This pioneering satellite system’s vital history is captured in this notable book.

Thursday

Plenary Sessions

Trends in Big Data Analytics and Progress in Using Earth Observations—Panel Discussion

Moderator: Kass Green, Kass Green and Associates
8:30 am to 10:00 am
Panelist
Michael S. Warren, Co-founder and CTO, Descartes Labs
Dr. Mike Warren is the Co-founder and CTO of Descartes Labs. His past work spans a wide range of disciplines, with the recurring theme of developing and applying advanced software and computing technology to understand the physical and virtual world. He was a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory for 25 years, and also worked as a Senior Software Engineer at Sandpiper Networks/Digital Island. His work has been recognized on multiple occasions, including the Gordon Bell prize for outstanding achievement in high-performance computing. He has degrees in Physics and Engineering & Applied Science from Caltech, and he received a Ph.D. in Physics from University of California, Santa Barbara.

Joe Mascaro, Director of Academic Programs, Planet
Dr. Joe Mascaro is a tropical ecologist and Director of Academic Programs at Planet, a San Francisco-based aerospace company that operates the largest fleet of Earth-imaging satellites. Joe works with universities and individual investigators to utilize Planet’s unprecedented imaging resources to enhance primary research and education, improve forest monitoring and conservation, expand food security, and promote ecological resilience for some of the world’s most vulnerable communities.

Adam Lewis, Geoscience Australia
Dr. Adam Lewis began his career as a Forester in Victoria. He played a lead role in Victoria’s first Geographic Information Systems and in new GIS-based approaches to forest and land planning. On completing his PhD at the ANU, Adam went on to develop the first depth & elevation model of the Great Barrier Reef and its catchments in 1998. In the early 2000’s his work with  the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority provided the essential information base to support re-zoning of the GBR Marine Park. That project won 2004 the Banksia Environmental Award for Government Leading by Example. Adam now leads Geoscience Australia’s National Earth and Marine Observation Branch, including the Australian Geoscience Data Cube, which was recognized in the Geospatial World Leadership Awards in 2016. The Data Cube is internationally recognized for transforming the analysis of Earth Observation datasets, and is delivering unique new information on Australia’s land, water, and coasts.

Anne Hale Miglarese, Founder and CEO, Radiant.Earth
Ms. Anne Hale Miglarese is the founding CEO of Radiant.Earth, a non-profit organization working to aggregate the world’s open Earth imagery and providing access and education on its use to the global development community. Prior to launching Radiant.Earth, Anne served as President and CEO of Fugro Earth Data, as President and CEO of PlanetiQ and a Principal Director at Booz Allen Hamilton. Anne has also worked for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the SC Water Resources Commission and the SC Department of Natural Resources. Anne was the founding chairperson of the National Geospatial Advisory Committee and served on the Federal Geographic Data Committee Marine and Coastal Data Subcommittee for 6 years.

TS #25

LCMAP Special Session 3: Time Series Research and Development

Moderator: James Vogelmann, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 1

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long land cover history, starting with the 1976 landmark A Land Use and Land Cover Classification System for use with Remote Sensor Data and including global land cover mapping and the ongoing production of the National Land Cover Database.  While these past projects have had a significant impact, land cover data needs are changing due to the demand for increasingly innovative and timely land cover products needed to meet the community’s insatiable appetite for science-quality geospatial land cover and land change data.  Recent research on the use of the unprecedented depth of the Landsat archive has resulted in the potential to generate higher quality results that include additional land cover variables, more detailed legends, and more frequent land cover and land change geospatial and statistical information. To capitalize on new capabilities, the USGS is working closely with researchers from Boston University and Texas Tech University to implement the Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) initiative.  LCMAP is envisioned as an end-to-end capability that uses the rich Landsat record to continuously track and characterize changes in land cover, use, and condition and translate such information into assessments of current and historical processes of cover and change. LCMAP aims to generate science-quality land cover and land change products from current and near-real time Landsat data. All available Landsat data for any given location are used to characterize land cover and change at any point across the full Landsat record and to detect and characterize land cover and land change as it occurs.
Three special sessions will: 1) lay out the foundations of LCMAP; 2) review the initial progress toward developing a new generation of land cover and land change products; and 3) examine how these new products are addressing land change applications.
Exploring the Landsat Archive Using Time Series Analysis
Curtis Woodcock, Boston University
Using a 30-year Landsat Time Series of Arctic and Boreal North America to Investigate Climate Change Impacts on Disturbance, Phenology, and Productivity
Damien Sulla-Menashe, Boston University
Curtis Woodcock, Chris Holden, and Mark Friedl
Impact of Climate Variability on Landsat Time Series and Implications for Change Monitoring
Chris Holden, Boston University
Curtis Woodcock
Monitoring Tropical Forest Degradation Using Time Series Analysis of Landsat Data
Eric Bullock, Boston University
Curtis Woodcock
Using Time Series and Statistical Inference Methods to Estimate Unbiased Land Cover Change Areas in the Colombian Amazon
Paulo Arevalo, Boston University
Curtis Woodcock and Pontus Olofsson

TS #26

Imaging Datasets

Moderator: Peter Doucette, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 10

Joint Agency Commercial Imagery Evaluation (JACIE)
Greg Stensaas, U.S. Geological Survey
An Update on Spaceborne Remote Sensing
Jon Christopherson, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Bridging Civilian and National Security Agencies: Update on the Civil Applications Committee
Paul Young, U.S. Geological Survey
NAIP Orthophotography for Land Cover Mapping Tasks: A Review with Recommendations
Aaron Maxwell, West Virginia University
Tim Warner
Global Fiducials Imagery: New Opportunities for Advancing the Use of Remote Sensing to Understand Our Changing Earth
Bruce Molnia, U.S. Geological Survey

TS #27

Cropland Mapping and Yield Estimation

Moderator: David Johnson, U.S. Department of Agriculture

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 6

Regional Estimation of Crop Yields from Satellite Imagery: The State of the Science, The State of the Industry
David Johnson, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Updated Methods for Retro Processing: Reprocessing the 2008 Cropland Data Layer
Avery Sandborn, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Patrick Willis, Richard Hardin, Robert Seffrin, and Lee Ebinger
Fusing Sentinel-1 with Harmonized Landsat Sentinel-2 for Crop Mapping
Nathan Torbick, Applied GeoSolutions
A Unique Global Hyperspectral-Imaging Spectral Library of Agricultural crops (GHISA) to Study Globally Dominant Crops
Itiya Aneece, U.S. Geological Survey
Prasad Thenkabail, Terry Slonecker, and Alfredo Huete
CropRef: Reference Datasets and Techniques to Improve Global Cropland Mapping
Jun Xiong, U.S. Geological Survey
Prasad Thenkabail, Russell Congalton, Kamini Yadav, Pardhasaradhi Teluguntla, Adam Oliphant, Murali Krishna Gumma, Richard Massey, and Corryn Smith

TS #28

National-scale Data Coordinated Within the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium (MRLC) – Special Session

Moderator: Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 8

The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium demonstrates the national benefits of USA Federal collaboration. Starting in the mid-1990s, MRLC has grown into a group of 10 USA Federal Agencies that coordinate the production of five National products, including the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP), the Cropland Data Layer (CDL), the Gap Analysis Program (GAP), and the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE). This session will overview the current status and future plans of these MRLC products.
The National Land Cover Database, Delivering Land Cover Change Data for the Nation Since 2001: History, Status and Future Plans
Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey
NOAA’s Focus on the Coasts: Bringing High Resolution Land Cover Mapping to the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium
Nate Herold, NOAA Office for Coastal Management
10 Years of Annual National Land Cover Products – the Cropland Data Layer
Rick Mueller, U.S. Department of Agriculture
The NLCD Tree Canopy Cover Data Product
Greg Liknes, U.S. Forest Service
LANDFIRE Remap – Developing a New Baseline Product Suite
Birgit Peterson, U.S. Geological Survey

TS #29

Urban and High Resolution Land Cover Mapping

Moderator: Kevin Gallo, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 11

Characterizations of Urban Land Cover by NLCD and Other Global Mapping Efforts
George Xian, U.S. Geological Survey
Urban Land Cover and Impervious Surface Changes in the Great Plains Between 2001 and 2011
Kevin Gallo, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
George Xian
Rapid Estimation of Tree Diversity Using Satellite Remote Sensing Within the Urban Environment
Abel Ramoelo, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research
Moses A. Cho, Sabelo Madonsela, and Sibusisiwe Makhanya
Shadow Removal in High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Using Local Inpainting Strategy
Samara Calcado de Azevedo, São Paulo State University (UNESP)
Evaluation of Landsat-Based Change Detection Methods using Ultra-high Resolution Land Cover Datasets
Michael Norton, Chesapeake Conservancy
Comparison Of Different Similarity Measures For Selection Of Optimal, Information-Centric Bands Of Hyperspectral Images
Munmun Baisantry, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, India
Dericks Shukla and Anil Sao

TS #30

Forest Change – Disturbance/Recovery

Moderator: Kurtis Nelson, U.S. Geological Survey

10:30 am to 12:00 noon—Room 13

A Landsat Spectral Ensemble for Forest Disturbance Mapping
Warren Cohen, U.S. Forest Service
Examining the Relationship Between Landsat Spectral Recovery and Volume Growth on Harvested Sites in the Southeastern United States
Todd Schroeder, U.S. Forest Service
Edyn: Dynamic Signaling of Subtle yet Persistent Changes to Forests
Evan Brooks, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Zhiqiang Yang, Valerie Thomas, and Randolph Wynne
Integrating Site- and Non-Site Specific Accuracy Assessments Approaches for Validating Land Change Maps
Mark Nelson, U.S. Forest Service
A 44-Year Time Series of Forest Structure In Northwestern Montana Using the Entire Landsat Archive Length From MSS to OLI (M2O)
Rick Lawrence, Montana State University
Shannon Savage

Special Event

Geospatial Munch and Meet!

12 noon to 1:30 pm—Room 1

Come have lunch and meet industry leaders in geospatial technologies and sciences! The Early Career Professionals Council, Education and Professional Development Committee, Student Advisory Council, and the Corporate (Sustaining) Members Council have joined forces to bring a fun lunchtime experience focusing on getting to know your peers and learning more about what ASPRS has to offer. During the lunch hour, subject matter experts will give short talks about:
Major advancements and innovations in GIS/RS/P science
How to become an ASPRS Certified Professional
Free and Paid Web Trainings
Where to find reference/study material
AND MUCH MORE!!
We look forward to joining you for lunch on Thursday. Come prepared to take notes on the presentation to win prizes!

Plenary Sessions

New Breakthroughs in Earth Observations and Applications— Panel Discussion

Moderator: Thomas R. Loveland, USGS
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM
The future of land remote sensing and the continuation of Pecora’s vision. Perspectives from panelist on their views on big data, data integration, monitoring, assessment, and projection. Special emphasis on the next generation of land remote sensing with prominent young remote sensing scientists and applications specialists giving their vision for the future.

Panelist

Valerie J. Pasquarella, Postdoctoral Fellow, Northeast Climate Science Center
Dr. Valerie Pasquarella works at the intersection of remote sensing and ecology, using time series of satellite imagery to improve mapping and monitoring of landscape dynamics. She is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the DOI Northeast Climate Science Center and the Department of Environmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Having lived and worked in Southern New England for over a decade, Dr. Pasquarella actively collaborates with a number of local research groups and land management agencies, and her research has strong regional ties. Ongoing projects include using Landsat time series to improve forest composition mapping and near-real-time monitoring of gypsy moth defoliation. She is also interested in time series approaches to mapping early successional habitat and invasive plant distributions, with a long-term goal of utilizing all available Landsat observations to advance understanding of multi-scale multi-species interactions over large spatial extents.

Todd J. Hawbaker, Research Ecologist, USGS
Dr. Todd Hawbaker is a research ecologist at the USGS Geosciences and Environmental Change Science Center in Lakewood, CO.  Prior to joining USGS in 2008, he pursued his graduate work at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  His research focuses on ecosystem disturbances, their impacts, and the processes driving them. His most recent work has been to develop an algorithm to identify burned areas using dense time series of Landsat data. Which he and his team have applied to the entire archive for the conterminous United States producing a 32-year data set for monitoring fire patterns and impacts.
Justin L. Huntington, Associate Research Professor, Desert Research Institute
Dr. Justin Huntington is an Associate Research Professor at the Desert Research Institute and Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada. Justin received his Ph.D. in Hydrology from the University of Nevada – Reno in 2011. His research interests are focused on land surface energy balance measurement and modeling, surface and groundwater interactions, drought, and remote sensing. He is a member of the 2012-2017 Landsat Science Team, and serves on Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval’s drought commission.

John A. Gamon, Professor, Co-Director, CALMIT, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Dr. John Gamon studies the “breathing of the planet” – the exchanges of carbon and water vapour between the biosphere and the atmosphere that affect ecosystem productivity and help regulate our atmosphere and climate. Of particular interest are the effects of disturbance (fires, succession, weather events and climate change) on these basic processes. Additional research questions involve the detection of plant physiology, ecosystem function, species composition, and biodiversity using non-contact sampling methods. Much of this work is done with optical monitoring (remote sensing and automated field methods), and entails the development of new monitoring methods and related informatics tools.

TS #31

Preparing Data for Scientific Analysis and Advancing Access

Moderator: Tom Maiersperger, U.S. Geological Survey

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM—Room 1

AppEEARS: Providing Easy Access, Extraction, and Fusion of Analysis Ready Data from Multiple Big Earth Science Data Records
William (Cory) Alden, Innovate, Inc.
Cole Krehbiel, Tom Maiersperger, Lindsey Harriman, Aaron Friesz, Rob Quenzer, Kevin Impecoven,  Aafaque Aafaque, and Chris Doescher,
Making Remote Sensing Data “Just Work” Using Standards-based Web Services
Aaron Friesz, Innovate, Inc.
An Open Data Cube Architecture for Water Management and Land Change Assessment
Brian Killough, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
Validation of Operational Cloud and Cloud Shadow Detection Algorithms for Landsat Data
Pat Scaramuzza, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.

TS #32

Phenology

Moderator: Jesslyn Brown, U.S. Geological Survey

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM—Room 6

Assessment of Vegetation Greenness Trends (1989 – 2016) and the Responses to Climatic Variability in the Conterminous Unites States
Lei Ji, ASRC InuTeq
Jesslyn Brown
Influence of Extreme Weather on Land Surface Phenology in the United States in Last Three Decades
Lingling Liu, South Dakota State University
Xiaoyang Zhang
Impacts of Wildfires on Land Surface Phenology of Western US Forests
Jianmin Wang, South Dakota State University
Xiaoyang Zhang
What Can Phenometric Lapse Rates Tell Us About Change in Highland Pastures?
Geoffrey Henebry, South Dakota State University
Monika Tomaszewska, and Kamilya Kelgenbaeva
Impacts of Interannual Variation in Data Quality from AVHRR, MODIS and VIIRS Time Series on Land Surface Phenology Detection
Xiaoyang Zhang, South Dakota State University
Inter-Comparison of MODIS and VIIRS Vegetation Indices Using One-Year Global Data
Tomoaki Miura, University of Hawaii-Manoa

TS #33—Special Session

National Land Cover Database: Past, Present and Future

Moderator: Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM—Room 8

This session will overview the design, products and status for NLCD 2016 and future programmatic plans for NLCD. NLCD 2016 products include land cover and urban imperviousness re-mapped for 2001-2016, tree canopy produced for 2011- 2016, and new 2016 products of percent shrub, bare ground and herbaceousness. NLCD 2016 is expected to be more accurate and comprehensive than any previous NLCD release, and will offer users an unprecedented set of land cover and land cover change products designed to continue, expand and advance NLCD applications.
NLCD 2016 Past and Present Product Comparison
Jon Dewitz, U.S. Geological Survey
Suming Jin
NLCD 2016 Landcover Design
Suming Jin, ASRC InuTeq
Limin Yang, Patrick Danielson, Jon Dewitz, Collin Homer, and George Xian
NLCD 2016 Imperviousness Product
Jon Dewitz, U.S. Geological Survey
Michelle Funk
NLCD 2016 Shrub and Grass Products
Collin Homer, U.S. Geological Survey
NLCD Future Plans
George Xian, U.S. Geological Survey
Collin Homer

TS #34

Wetlands and Surface Water Bodies

Moderator: Sandra Poppenga, U.S. Geological Survey

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM—Room 11

Tracking Pluvial-Related Expansion and Contraction of Water Bodies in the South Dakota Prairie Pothole Region Using the Landsat Record with an Object-Based Image Analysis Approach
Nathan Roberts, Penn State University
Douglas Miller
Characterizing Wetland Landscapes with Landsat Dense Time Series Data
Jennifer Rover, U.S. Geological Survey
Alisa Gallant, and Qiang Zhou
Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Model Past and Present Distributions of Invasive Species in Alaskan Wetlands
Timothy Mayer,  Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Emma Hatcher, Sarah Carroll, Audrey Martinez, and Brian Woodward
Annual Maps of Water-Related Land Cover Types (Open Surface Water Body, Natural Wetlands, and Paddy Rice) Through Analyses of Landsat Images in Google Earth Engine
Xiangming Xiao, University of Oklahoma
Zhenhua Zou, Geli Zhang, Jinwei Dong, and Bangqian Chen

TS #35

Mapping for Management and Species Dynamics

Moderator: Warren Cohen, U.S. Forest Service

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM—Room 13

Identification of Moderate Intensity Forest Management in the Southeastern U.S. with Multitemporal Landsat
Valerie Thomas, Virginia Tech
Randolph Wynne, Evan Brooks, Quinn Thomas, Louise Chini, R. Bin Mei, and David Wear
Using Google Earth Engine and Landsat Time Series to Model National Forest Inventory Variables
Ty Wilson, U.S. Forest Service
Mapping and Quantifying Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Related to Terrestrial Vertebrates: A National Approach
Kenneth Boykin, New Mexico State University
William Kepner, Anne Neale, and Kevin Gergely
Mangrove Mapping and Monitoring Using Earth Observation Satellite Data
Chandra Giri, Environmental Protection Agency
Using Unmanned Aerial Systems to Evaluate Shrub Community Characteristics in a Semi-Arid Landscape
R. Douglas Ramsey, Utah State University
Christopher McGinty

Posters

Advancing the Use of Remote Sensing to Understand our Changing Earth
WorldView-3 SWIR Landuse-Landcover Mineral Classification: Cuprite, Nevada
Kathleen E. Johnson, DigitalGlobe, Inc
K. Koperski
Google Earth Engine for Eigenspace Spectral and Temporal Transforms of Landsat 8 and Sentinel-2 Data Sets
Lance D. Yarbrough, The University of Mississippi
Greg Easson and Eleanor Dietz
Validation of the Operational SNPP VIIRS GVF Product using High Resolution Google Earth images
Zhangyan Jiang, IMSG at NOAA/NESDIS/STAR
Development of a Semi-automated Process to Map Agriculture in the Upper Rio Grande Basin During the 2015 Growing Season using Spectral Grouping
Victoria G. Stengel, U.S. Geological Survey
Diana E. Pedraza
Evaluation of SMAP at Forested Sites Across a Rainfall Gradient in Northern Minnesota
Greg Liknes, Bemidji State University
William Sea
Requirements, Capabilities and Analysis for Earth Observations (RCA-EO)
Greg Stensaas, U.S. Geological Survey
Snow Cover Seasonality, Trends, and Change Analysis for Kyrgyzstan using MODIS: 2000-2016
Monika A. Tomaszewska, South Dakota State University
Kamilya Kelgenbaeva and Geoffrey M. Henebry
AmericaView
Update on the Iowa Best Management Practice Inventory, Applications and Associated Datasets
Robin McNeely, IowaView – Iowa State University
Modeling the Effects of Environmental Change on Crucial Wildlife Habitat
Kenneth G. Boykin, New MexicoView/New Mexico State University
Eric Ariel L. Salas, Virginia A. Seamster, Nicole M. Harings, and Keith W. Dixon
Using Remote Sensing Data to Improve Geographic Assessments of UV-B Radiation and its Climatology from a Sparse Ground Monitoring Network
Michael Coughenour, UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, Colorado State University
Aligning Earth Observation Technologies with Next Generation Science Standards
Chandi Witharana, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, ConnecticutView, University of Connecticut
James Hurd
South Dakota LiDAR Factsheet
Mary O’Neill, South Dakota State University/AmericaView
RealEarth: Visualize Your Data
Sam Batzli, WisconsinView
New Methods for Integrating Remote Sensing Imagery and Modeled Inundation Libraries for Rapid Flood Mapping
Kevin Dobbs, AmericaView/KansasView
Mapathon—A Volunteer Geographic Information Mapping for Humanitarian Relief
Pia van Benthem, University of California-Davis
Integration of Landsat-8 and high-resolution imagery, and LiDAR to improve mapping of water bodies at regional scales
Haluk Cetin, Murray State University
Incorporating Remote Sensing into K-12 Project-Based Science Curricula
Nancy H.F. French, Michigan Tech Research Institute
Michael J. Battaglia
Working with Time-series Landsat Big Data: A Workflow and Experiences with Open Source Software
Jeong Seong, University of West Georgia
Mapping and Monitoring Shelterbelt Dynamics in the Red River of the North Valley using Naip and Lidar Data
Bradley Rundquist, University of North Dakota
Morgen Burke and Earl Klug
Applications of Remote Sensing for Improving Decision-making
High Density LiDAR Acquisition for Forest Resource Assessment, Applications and Initial Results from a Study in Northern Minnesota
Scott Hillard, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources
Dennis Kepler
Unsupervised Classification of Earth Surface for Landslide Detection
Caitlin Tran, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona
Jessica Fayne, Omar Mora, and Joy Sellman
All Quiet on the Northern Front: Remote Sensing Based Retrospection of Human Wellbeing in the Armed-Conflicted Areas of Sri Lanka
Chandi Witharana, University of Connecticut
Utilizing Sentinel-2 Satellite Imagery for Precision Agriculture over Potato Fields In Lebanon
Hanan Abou Ali, Idaho State University
Donna M. Delparte and L. Michael Griffel
Applied Remote Sensing as a Means to Assess Brush Control in Western Rangelands
Chandra Holifield Collins, USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center
Susan Skirvin, Mark Kautz, and Loretta Metz
Global SSEBop Evapotranspiration for Drought Monitoring Purposes
Stefanie Kagone, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Expedited Start of Growing Season Estimates Assist Rapid Prediction of Invasive Cheatgrass in the Great Basin
Bruce B. Worstell, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Stephen Boyte, Danny Howard, Jesslyn Brown, Bruce Wylie, and Devendra Dahal
Applying Object-based Image Analysis to the Search for World War II Era Unexploded Bombs Using High-Resolution Multi-temporal and Multi-source Data
Cynthia A. Miller, Minnesota State University, Mankato
Bryan P. Byholm, Anna K. Brand, and Fei Yuan
Selection of Ratings & Weightages for Preparation of Landslide Susceptibility Zonation (LSZ)
Sharad Kumar Gupta, Indian Institute of Technology, Mandi
Dericks Praise Shukla
Genetic Algorithm Based Stereo Image Correspondence Using Multi-objective Fitness Function For Remotely Sensed Images
Manimala Mahato, Indian Institute of Technology
Shirish S. Gedam, Jyoti Joglekar, and B. Krishna Mohan
Assessing Sustainable Urban Rooftop Designs through the usage of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems and Satellite Imagery: A case study in Auburn, Alabama
Chandana Mitra, Auburn University
Austin Bush and Seth Greer
Building Capacity to Use NASA Earth Observations through the NASA DEVELOP Program
Lauren Childs-Gleason, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
The Study of Forest Cover Change in Puerto Rico since 1970s using Satellite Imagery
Fei Yuan, Minnesota State University-Mankato
Jose Javier Lopez, Sabrina Arnold, Anna Brand, Jonas Klein, Maureen Schmidt, Erin Moseman, and Madeline Michels-Boyce
Assimilation of Earth Observations into Land Surface Dynamic Models General Circulation Models and other Earth System Models
Development of Global Gridded Vegetation Products From S-NPP VIIRS for NCEP Environmental Modeling Systems
Jingfeng Huang, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Mingshi Chen, Zhangyan Jiang,  Min Li,  Tomoaki Miura, Marco Vargas, and Ivan Csiszar
Challenges and Innovations in Big Data Analysis for Solving Complex Largescale Problems
Tutorials and Services for Working with Multiple Land Remote Sensing Data Products
Cole Krehbiel, Innovatel, Inc.
Aaron Friesz, Tom Maiersperger, Lindsey Harriman, William (Cory) Alden, and Chris Doescher
Using Google Earth Engine to Map Water Use and Availability
Mac Friedrichs, Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc.
Big Data, Small Farms: Lessons Learned from Integrating Data Science Approaches with Remote Sensing of Smallholder and Urban Agriculture
Jessica L. McCarty, Miami University
Christoper S.R. Neigh,  Mark L. Carroll, Margaret R. Wooten, Molly E. Brown, Glenn M. Sullivan, Rahel Diro, Daniel E. Osgood, Markus Enenkel, and Bristol F. Powell
Emerging Roles for Smallsats and Airborne Systems in Operational Monitoring
Multiuser Perspectives on Experimental UAS Flight Operations
Timmera Whaley
Jason Tullis
Landsat and Sentinel-2: Comparisons Cross-calibrations and Synergies
Monitoring Chlorophyll-a of the Western Basin of Lake Erie with Sentinel-2A and Landsat 8 imagery
Anita Simic Milas, Bowling Green State University
Assessing Three Satellite-derived Burned Area Products and Combining with Medium Resolution Data for Characterizing Peatland Fires
Yenni Vetrita, South Dakota State University
Mark A. Cochrane, Suwarsono Suwarsono, Any Zubaidah, and Erianto I. Putra
New initiatives for Monitoring and Projecting Land and Water Cover Use And Change
Identifying Forest Conversion Hotspots in the Commonwealth of Virginia Through the Use of Landsat and Known Change Indicators
Matthew N. House, Virginia Tech
Randolph H. Wynne
Assessing Land Cover Change During Drought Period in a Coastal Area of Binh Thuan province, Vietnam Using High Resolution Imagery
James B. Campbell, Virginia Tech
Hoa Tran and Randolph H. Wynne
Developing Unbiased Global Et Dataset using an Automated Bias Correction Approach
Naga Manohar Velpuri, ASRC InuTeq
Gabriel Senay, Stefanie Kagone, and MacKenzie Friedrichs
Gross Primary Productivity and Seasonal Distribution of Alpine Wetlands from 2001 to 2016 in the Gunnison River Basin, CO
Sami Chen, Stanford University
Kate Maher
Land Surface Phenologies and Seasonalities of Croplands and Grasslands in the Prairie Pothole Region Using Passive Microwave Data 2003-2015
Woubet G. Alemu, South Dakota State University
Geoffrey M. Henebry
The Land Product Characterization System: A Tool for Comparative Analysis of Satellite Data and Products
Kevin Gallo, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Methods for Converting Continuous Shrubland Ecosystem Component Values to Thematic National Land Cover Database Classes
Leila Gass, U.S. Geological Survey
Matthew Rigge, Collin Homer, and George Xian
Estimating Percent Tree Canopy Cover Using Landsat Time-Series
Jill M. Derwin, Virginia Tech
Valerie Thomas, Randolph Wynne, Evan B. Brooks, Christine E. Blinn, Greg Liknes, John Coulston, Mark Finco, Kevin Megown, Gretchen Moisen, Chris Toney, Robert Benton, K. Schelleweis, and Bonnie Ruefenacht
Changes In Land Use and Consumptive Water Use in Central California
Martha Anderson, U.S. Department of Agriculture
Kyle Knipper, Wayne Dulaney, Joe Alfieri, Bill Kustas, Yun Yang, Dennis Baldocchi, Feng Gao, and Chris Hain
Mapping Evapotranspiration for Historical (1984-2015) Water Use and Availability in the Upper Rio Grande River Basin using the Landsat Archive
Matt Schauer, Innovate!, Inc.
Mapping Evapotranspiration for Historical (1984-2015) Water use and availability in the Upper Rio Grande River Basin using the Landsat Archive
Matt Schauer, Innovate!, Inc.
2016 Tree Canopy Cover for the National Land Cover Database: Production Data, Methods, Uses, and a Tour through American Landscapes
Stacie Bender, U.S. Forest Service
Wendy Goetz, Mark Finco, Bonnie Ruefenacht, Greg Liknes, and Kevin Megown

Social Events

Welcome Lunch

Tuesday, November 14th, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm—Exhibit Hall 2

Have lunch on us! Come to the Exhibit Hall to visit with the wonderful exhibiting companies in attendance and grab a quick lunch. A great way to begin your Symposium week.
Admission to this event is included with most registrations.

Exhibitors’ Reception

Tuesday, November 14th, 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm—Exhibit Hall 2

Take this wonderful opportunity to visit with the national and international suppliers exhibiting at the Symposium. An ASPRS tradition, the Exhibitors’ Reception is a perfect time to mingle with fellow attendees, thank the Conference Exhibitors’, our hosts for the evening, and stop by to view the wonderful Posters on display and interact with the authors. The evening is sure to provide a relaxed environment with light hors d’oeuvres and beverages and a time to come together with old and new friends.

Admission to this event is included with most registrations.

Posters Sessions

5:30 pm to 7:30 pm—Exhibit Hall 2

Take time to view the various posters on display and speak with the presenter. Poster presenters are asked to be near their work at this time and available to answer questions and expand on their research. In addition, poster presenters are requested to be near their poster during lunch breaks, as their schedule allows. Posters will be on display throughout the conference and open for viewing.

Lunch with Exhibitors’

Wednesday and Thursday, November 15th and 16th; 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm—Exhibit Hall 2

Take some time out of your busy week and have lunch with Exhibitors. A much needed 90-minute break in the middle of the day will surely refresh you with a complimentary lunch and some good conversation. Take time to meet with our generous exhibiting companies, view posters, and even catch–up with friends.
Admission to this event is included with most registrations.

Landsat’s Enduring Legacy Book Unveiling

Wednesday, November 15th 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm— Exhibit Hall 2

Join us at a special evening session for the unveiling of the Landsat Legacy book and take the opportunity to meet the book’s authors.  After more than 15 years of research and writing, the Landsat Legacy Project Team and the ASPRS have published a seminal work on the nearly half-century of monitoring Earth’s lands with Landsat.  Born of technologies that evolved from the Second World War, Landsat not only pioneered global land monitoring, in the process it also drove innovation in digital imaging technologies and encouraged development of global imagery archives. Access to this imagery led to early breakthroughs in natural resources assessments, particularly for agriculture, forestry, and geology.  With the emergence of twenty-first century Earth system science research, the full value of the Landsat concept and its continuous 45-year global archive has only recently been recognized and embraced.  This pioneering satellite system’s vital history is captured in this notable book.

Refreshment Breaks – Exhibit Hall

Exhibit Hall 2

Each day of the symposium refreshment breaks will be served in the Exhibit Hall. Take a break from the technical track sessions to network, visit the fantastic booths, and grab cup of coffee or soda.
Admission to this event is included with most registrations.